How to Protect Your Small Businesses from Burglars

Small business employees should stay silent during a robbery unless they are asked a question by the robber, and they should move slowly and deliberately to avoid the perception of an attack. Furthermore, it isn’t a good idea to try to follow the criminal out of the store to get a description or a license plate number, especially if he is armed.

Small businesses are arguably the best targets for robbery because they rarely have advanced security measures to guard against potential crime. If you own a small business, your job is to make it as difficult as possible for someone to commit a robbery in your store or office. To do this, you’ll need to know a bit about how to keep your business safe.

Opening and Closing

When you or an employee opens or closes your small business, you can avoid robbery by working in twos or threes. A lone employee trying to open or close is extremely vulnerable to attack, so make sure there are at least two people present at all times. This might be difficult if you’re a one-person shop, but bringing a friend or relative is just as effective as having another store employee.

Alarm Systems

Homes are not the only structures that benefit from security systems. A standard alarm system will do wonders for your small business, and can protect it against robbery when you aren’t there to stand guard. In addition to the security system itself, place a notice in a window or out front that tells potential criminals that your store is constantly monitored.

Cameras

Even small businesses need technological devices that can help guard against robbery and theft. Installing a security camera that faces the cash register is the best way to do this, and can increase the safety quotient for your entire store. Additionally, this can help police officers find the perpetrator if you are ever a victim.

Bank Deposits

If your small business involves accepting cash or checks from customers, it is important to practice safety measures when making bank deposits. Don’t carry the money in a bank-issued satchel, for example, because this alerts the public to what you’re doing. Furthermore, it is a good idea to take different routes to the bank every day, and to go at different types. A schedule is something that a robber can memorize, and therefore use against you.

View

It is best for your small business to place the cash register near a front window or glass door so that police officers and other passerby can see it from the street or parking lot. This makes thieves feel exposed, and might consequently avoid a robbery. Avoid putting the cash register at the back where it can’t be seen by anyone.

Law Enforcement

It is beneficial for the owner of a small business to build a friendly relationship with the local police department. Give officers discounts so that they will stop by your store frequently, which can also discourage a robbery. You can also order a routine patrol so that law enforcement is constantly on the lookout for potential safety issues.

Lighting

When a criminal feels vulnerable, he or she is unlikely to commit a robbery, so make sure your small business is adequately lighted. Both interior and exterior lights should be checked on a regular basis to ensure they are in working order, and you should make sure employees report outages immediately.

Cash Registers

It is never a good idea to keep large amounts of cash in your cash registers, especially after dark. Empty them out on a regular basis and place the excess in a well-hidden safe so that robbery is discouraged. If you have multiple registers, leave them open when not in use to show that there is a limited amount of cash on hand.

Personal Items

Employee theft is another concern of your small business, and you should take measures to avoid it at all costs so that your employees feel safe at work. Give each member of your staff a locker or area where they can store their personal belongings, such as purses, wallets and clothes. Each locker should have a separate combination.

In Case of a Robbery

If your small business is unable to avoid a robbery, despite all of the above precautions, it is important that you and your staff are trained to deal with a criminal. For example, never look directly at a robber while handing over money because he will be more likely to injure you to keep you from identifying him.

Additionally, money and merchandise should come in second to safety, which means that you should comply with whatever the robber demands. Tell your employees to avoid being a hero or protecting the store because it could cost them their lives. Instead, just hand over whatever is requested with no complaints.

Small business employees should stay silent during a robbery unless they are asked a question by the robber, and they should move slowly and deliberately to avoid the perception of an attack. Furthermore, it isn’t a good idea to try to follow the criminal out of the store to get a description or a license plate number, especially if he is armed.

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